Investing

The Cost of Procrastination

Presented by Beacon Financial Group

Don't let procrastination keep you from pursuing your financial goals.

Some of us share a common experience. You’re driving along when a police cruiser pulls up behind you with its lights flashing. You pull over, the officer gets out, and your heart drops.

 

“Are you aware the registration on your car has expired?”

 

You’d been meaning to take care of it for some time. For weeks, you had told yourself that you’d go to renew your registration tomorrow, and then, when the morning comes, you repeat it again.

 

Procrastination is avoiding a task that needs to be done – postponing until tomorrow what could be done, today. Procrastinators can sabotage themselves. They often put obstacles in their own path. They may choose paths that hurt their performance.

 

Though Mark Twain famously quipped, “Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.” We know that procrastination can be detrimental, both in our personal and professional lives. From the college paper that gets put off to the end of the semester to that important sales presentation that waits until the end of the week for the attention it deserves, we’ve all procrastinated on something.

 

Problems with procrastination in the business world have led to a sizable industry in books, articles, workshops, videos, and other products created to deal with the issue. There are a number of theories about why people procrastinate, but whatever the psychology behind it, procrastination may, potentially, cost money – particularly, when investments and financial decisions are put off.

 

As the example below shows, putting off investing may put off potential returns.

Early Bird. Let’s look at the case of Cindy and Charlie, who each invest a hypothetical $10,000 to start. One of them begins immediately, but the other puts investing off.

 

Charlie begins depositing $10,000 a year in an account that earns a hypothetical 6% rate of return. Then, after 10 years, he stops making deposits. His invested assets, however, are free to keep growing and compounding.

 

While Charlie fills his account, Cindy waits 10 years before getting started. She then starts to invest a hypothetical $10,000 a year for 10 years into an account that also earns a hypothetical 6% rate of return.

Cindy and Charlie have both invested the same $100,000, but procrastination costs Cindy, as Charlie’s balance is much higher at the end of 20 years. Over 20 years, his account has grown to $237,863, while Cindy’s account has only grown to $132,822. Charlie’s account has not only put the power of compound interest to work, it has also allowed the investment returns more time to compound. 1

 

This is a hypothetical example of mathematical compounding. It’s used for comparison purposes only and is not intended to represent the past or future performance of any investment. Taxes and investment costs were not considered in this example. The results are not a guarantee of performance or specific investment advice. The rate of return on investments will vary over time, particularly for longer-term investments. Investments that offer the potential for high returns also carry a high degree of risk. Actual returns will fluctuate. The types of securities and strategies illustrated may not be suitable for everyone.


This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

 

 

Citations.

1 - nerdwallet.com/banking/calculator/compound-interest-calculator [12/13/18]

Weekly Economic Update 4/22/2019

Presented by Beacon Financial Group

In this week’s recap: stocks move sideways as earnings season gathers momentum, and retail sales jump.

THE WEEK ON WALL STREET

A short and relatively placid trading week wrapped up Thursday, with the major indices turning in mixed performances. The S&P 500 retreated 0.08%, the Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.17%, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.56%. The MSCI EAFE index, tracking foreign stocks in developed countries, added 0.65%. 1-4

Nothing really catalytic emerged to drive the market last week, and volumes were low.

 

Earnings Season Update

More than 78% of S&P 500 firms reporting so far this earnings season have surpassed analyst expectations, according to FactSet. Since guidance tends to be conservative, there is the possibility that more companies will beat forecasts than expected. 5

The initial public offering market remained strong. Two high-profile technology companies came public on Thursday and were met with enthusiasm from investors. As mentioned in recent weeks, 2019 could be a banner year for IPOs. 

 

Retail Sales Rebound

March’s 1.6% gain was the biggest monthly advance seen since September 2017. Sales of cars and gasoline rose more than 3%. 6

If the upcoming March consumer spending report is also impressive, concerns about the current business cycle peaking may recede.

Final Thought

Nearly 800 companies will report earnings this week, including some high-profile names. This kicks off five weeks of active daily earnings reports.

Investors will watch corporate profits, guidance, and fundamental indicators with great interest, to try and glean whether the economy is strengthening or softening. Reports on first-quarter economic growth and existing home sales will command particular attention.

TIP OF THE WEEK


Your insurance needs should be reevaluated every few years. Life events like a marriage, a home purchase, or retirement may mean you need more (or less) coverage.

THE WEEK AHEAD: KEY ECONOMIC DATA

Monday: March existing home sales figures from the National Association of Realtors.

Tuesday: March new home sales numbers from the Census Bureau.

Friday: The first estimate of first-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) from the federal government, and the final April University of Michigan consumer sentiment index, a gauge of consumer confidence levels.

Source: Econoday / MarketWatch Calendar, April 18, 2019

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The forecasts or forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and may not materialize. The forecasts also are subject to revision. The release of data may be delayed without notice for a variety of reasons.

 

THE WEEK AHEAD: COMPANIES REPORTING EARNINGS

Monday: Halliburton (HAL), Kimberly-Clark (KMB), Whirlpool (WHR)

Tuesday: Coca-Cola (KO), Harley-Davidson (HOG), Procter & Gamble (PG), Twitter (TWTR), Verizon (VZ)

Wednesday: Anthem (ANTM), Boeing (BA), Caterpillar (CAT), Facebook (FB)

Thursday: 3M (MMM), AbbVie (ABBV), Amazon (AMZN), Starbucks (SBUX)

Friday: American Airlines (AAL), Colgate-Palmolive (CL), ExxonMobil (XOM)

Source: Morningstar.com, April 18, 2019

Companies mentioned are for informational purposes only. It should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of the securities. Any investment should be consistent with your objectives, time frame, and risk tolerance. The return and principal value of investments will fluctuate as market conditions change. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost. Companies may reschedule when they report earnings without notice.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

You are the only person on earth who can use your ability.

ZIG ZIGLAR

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results.  Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

 

CITATIONS:

1 - quotes.wsj.com/index/SPX [4/18/19] 

2 - quotes.wsj.com/index/DJIA [4/18/19]         

3 - quotes.wsj.com/index/COMP [4/18/19]        

4 - quotes.wsj.com/index/XX/990300/historical-prices [4/18/19]

5 - cnbc.com/2019/04/18/stocks-market-earnings-retail-sales-and-jobless-data-in-focus.html [4/18/19]

6 - reuters.com/article/us-usa-economy-retail/us-retail-sales-post-biggest-gain-in-one-and-a-half-years-in-march-idUSKCN1RU1GI [4/18/19]

CHART CITATIONS:

quotes.wsj.com/index/SPX [4/18/19] 

quotes.wsj.com/index/DJIA [4/18/19]          

quotes.wsj.com/index/COMP [4/18/19]        

quotes.wsj.com/index/XX/990300/historical-prices [4/18/19]

markets.wsj.com [4/18/19]

 

treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yield [4/18/19]

 

treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yieldAll [4/18/19]

Weekly Economic Update 4/15/2019

Presented by Beacon Financial Group

In this week’s recap: stocks advance after earnings season gets off to an encouraging start, and consumer prices rise the most in more than a year.

THE WEEK ON WALL STREET

Stocks broke out of a narrow range on Friday following news that two major banks grew their bottom line in the first quarter. For the week, the S&P 500 rose 0.79%; the Nasdaq Composite, 0.91%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average improved 0.50%. Turning to overseas stocks, the MSCI EAFE index declined 0.09% 1-4

The market spent much of the week in a lull as investors waited for earnings season to begin. Wall Street is paying close attention to both guidance and profit margins.

 

Big Banks Post Solid Results

Friday, Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase both reported Q1 profit growth, and JPMorgan Chase announced record revenue. 5

This was welcomed news. Analysts have tempered some of their expectations entering this earnings season, recognizing that slowing global growth, tariffs, and dollar strength may be affecting corporate profits. (The dollar rallied 6.2% in Q1.) 6

[Companies mentioned are for informational purposes only. It should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of the securities.]   

Inflation Picks Up

The Consumer Price Index rose 0.4% in March, the most in 14 months. This matched the consensus forecast of economists polled by MarketWatch, who believed rising gas prices would affect the number.

Even with this March jump, annual inflation remained relatively tame at 1.9%. 7

 

What’s Ahead

Note that U.S. stock and bond markets will be closed on Good Friday (April 19).

TIP OF THE WEEK

Life insurance is not solely for people with spouses and kids. If you are a caregiver to an ill parent, have significant debt, or simply wish to avoid having others pay for your funeral, life insurance coverage could prove very important in the event of your passing.

THE WEEK AHEAD: KEY ECONOMIC DATA

Thursday: March retail sales.

Friday: March housing starts and building permits.

Source: Econoday / MarketWatch Calendar, April 12, 2019

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The forecasts or forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and may not materialize. The forecasts also are subject to revision. The release of data may be delayed without notice for a variety of reasons.

 

THE WEEK AHEAD: COMPANIES REPORTING EARNINGS

Monday: Citigroup (C), Goldman Sachs (GS)

Tuesday: Bank of America (BAC), BlackRock (BLK), Comerica (CMA), IBM (IBM), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Netflix (NFLX), UnitedHealth Group (UNH)

Wednesday: Abbott Labs (ABT), Alcoa (AA), Bank of New York Mellon (BNY), Morgan Stanley (MS), PepsiCo (PEP), U.S. Bancorp (USB), United Rentals (URI)

Thursday: American Express (AMEX), Honeywell (HON), Manpower (MAN), Philip Morris (PM), Schlumberger (SLB), Travelers Companies (TRV), Union Pacific (UNP).

Source: Morningstar.com, April 12, 2019.

Companies mentioned are for informational purposes only. It should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of the securities. Any investment should be consistent with your objectives, time frame, and risk tolerance. The return and principal value of investments will fluctuate as market conditions change. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost. Companies may reschedule when they report earnings without notice.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“To fly we have to have resistance.”

MAYA LIN

Know someone who could use information like this?

Please feel free to send us their contact information via phone or email. (Don’t worry – we’ll request their permission before adding them to our mailing list.)

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. The information herein has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All market indices discussed are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Indices do not incur management fees, costs and expenses, and cannot be invested into directly. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is a market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P 500) is a market-cap weighted index composed of the common stocks of 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world's largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. MarketingPro, Inc. is not affiliated with any person or firm that may be providing this information to you. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

CITATIONS:

1 - quotes.wsj.com/index/SPX [4/12/19] 

2 - quotes.wsj.com/index/DJIA [4/12/19]         

3 - quotes.wsj.com/index/COMP [4/12/19]        

4 - quotes.wsj.com/index/XX/990300/historical-prices [4/12/19]  

5 - cnn.com/2019/04/12/investing/wells-fargo-bank-earnings/index.html [4/12/19]

6 - tinyurl.com/y45wuftu [4/12/19]

7 - marketwatch.com/story/higher-gas-prices-boost-cost-of-living-in-march-but-inflation-still-soft-cpi-shows-2019-04-10 [4/10/19]

CHART CITATIONS:

quotes.wsj.com/index/SPX [4/12/19] 

quotes.wsj.com/index/DJIA [4/12/19]         

quotes.wsj.com/index/COMP [4/12/19]        

quotes.wsj.com/index/XX/990300/historical-prices [4/12/19]

markets.wsj.com [4/12/19]

 

treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yield [4/12/19]

 

treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yieldAll [4/12/19]

Do Our Biases Affect Our Financial Choices?

Presented by Beacon Financial Group

Even the most seasoned investors are prone to their influence.

Investors are routinely warned about allowing their emotions to influence their decisions.  They are less routinely cautioned about letting their preconceptions and biases color their financial choices.

 

In a battle between the facts & our preconceptions, our preconceptions may win. If we acknowledge this tendency, we may be able to avoid some unexamined choices when it comes to personal finance; it may actually “pay” us to recognize our biases as we invest. Here are some common examples of bias creeping into our financial lives. 1

  

Valuing outcomes of investment decisions more than the quality of those decisions. An investor thinks, “I got a great return from that decision,” instead of thinking, “that was a good decision because ______.”

 

How many investment decisions do we make that have a predictable outcome? Hardly any. In retrospect, it is all too easy to prize the gain from a decision over the wisdom of the decision, and to, therefore, believe that the decisions with the best outcomes were in fact the best decisions (not necessarily true). 

Valuing facts we “know” & “see” more than “abstract” facts. Information that seems abstract may seem less valid or valuable than information that relates to personal experience. This is true when we consider different types of investments, the state of the markets, and the health of the economy.

 

Valuing the latest information most. In the investment world, the latest news is often more valuable than old news, but when the latest news is consistently good (or consistently bad), memories of previous market climate(s) may become too distant. If we are not careful, our minds may subconsciously dismiss the eventual emergence of the next bear (or bull) market. 

     

Being overconfident. The more experienced we are at investing, the more confidence we have about our investment choices. When the market is going up and a clear majority of our investment choices work out well, this reinforces our confidence, sometimes to a point where we may start to feel we can do little wrong, thanks to the state of the market, our investing acumen, or both. This can be dangerous.

 

The herd mentality. You know how this goes: if everyone is doing something, they must be doing it for sound and logical reasons. The herd mentality is what leads many investors to buy high (and sell low). It can also promote panic selling. Above all, it encourages market timing – and when investors try to time the market, they frequently realize subpar returns.

       

Sometimes, asking ourselves what our certainty is based on and what it reflects about ourselves can be a helpful and informative step. Examining our preconceptions may help us as we invest.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Citations.

1 - forbes.com/sites/theyec/2018/12/14/three-psychological-biases-that-prevent-effective-financial-management [12/14/18]